Red Chair Visits Bartlesville, Oklahoma — Part Three

Another post from Olive Swan

The Phillips colors weren’t always red, white, and black. When the company first started, the gas stations were green, and the logo orange and black. Phillips wanted the stations to be neat and clean for the travelers that stopped there. This replica stands near the entrance to Woolaroc.

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Frank Phillips filled his Woolaroc ranch with a variety of unique animals. They roam free on the land, like these long-horn cattle variety that found a shady spot near the road (pic 1). There are bison on the other shore of the lake and a deer of some sort in the distance standing in the shallows (pics 2 & 3)

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The kids’ area at Woolaroc features a petting zoo and a playground with small scale old west buildings. Not quite the same scale as Little Red, but almost.

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Woolaroc’s Fine Arts museum features Western Art – paintings and sculptures. It also has “the authenticated bronze by Daniel Chestser French from which the Lincoln Memorial was made.” (from the plaque just out of site in Pic 1). Naturally Little Red and my own ‪#‎TomTomtheTravelingTurkey‬ had to get their photo by Lincoln.

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Pic 2 shows some the fine stone-work mural that flank the entrance doors to the museum (not shown). If you look back a few days to the Woolaroc buffalo, you can see that the designer painted the buffalo in honor of the entrance.

The stonework by the doors to the museum at Woolaroc. The doors (not pictured) are to the right of the wavy white and red lines on the right of the photo.

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Aside from the art exhibits, there are also ones relating to the history of Phillips and the oil industry in Oklahoma.

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Frank Phillips and his wife Jane had a house in town and a lodge at Woolaroc. I’ve combined the two homes into one post, but you should be able to tell them apart.

You can tour their city home at one of the many tour times during the day, but the lodge rooms are off-limits most of the year. However, the main room is open and anyone can stop in and see all the heads on the wall. Animals heads, thankfully.

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Last Woolaroc post. I know this disappoints you greatly, and since you probably want to see more of this interesting place, I would suggest you come out and visit Bartlesville and see Woolaroc for yourself. These photos and my poor skills can hardly capture the magic of Woolaroc.

The photos today were taken at the Mountain Man camp which is open from May to October. One of the mountain men, Roger, even allowed me to take his photo with Little Red. The other picture is of Little Red sitting in a teepee.

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